Hollywood may have finally milked future dystopia and the post-apocalypse to death but I still get tickled pink every time an unexpected writer throws their hat into the sci-fi ring. This week’s New Yorker gives us Zadie Smith (of White Teeth and On Beauty fame) with an original story in that genre. It’s not wholly complete, in the way that short story sketches are wont to be, but it does have some intriguing extrapolations about living in a future mediated age of augmented realities and contextual displacement.

In “Meet the President!” Bill Peek is a young boy outfitted with some sort of personal technology (descriptive details are both few and ambiguous) temporarily visiting a nature scene whose nearby human inhabitants have not been privy to the same toys he has. His special equipment allows him simultaneous access to the world’s information and a more interesting existence in the form of a virtual layer that gamifies his real-world surroundings. The equipment also allows Bill to be perpetually distracted and disinclined to connect with the primitive, technologically unaided young girl and older woman he encounters in real life. Why live in the Now when you could always live in the More Interesting?

As one might guess, the story (thin plot and all) isn’t really about the tech itself. It may not even be about the inherent relationship with technology and class, something Smith is probably quite interested in; it may simply be about quality of life, of finding a true experience. The title seems flippant but the ending is infused with such strange foreboding that one could interpret this story’s theme in a number of pleasurable or damning ways. I have yet to read any of her books to know where these ideas stand in relation but I wouldn’t mind a return trip to the world of this brief but interesting thought experiment.